Tag Archives: Video Surveillance Systems

Iowa casino ups its game with Tyco Security Products Video Surveillance Solution

As one of Iowa’s most successful casino resorts, WinnaVegas Casino and Resort knows how to help guests relax in style. With a 24-hour casino, arcade, fitness center, pool, fine dining and event center, guests have all they could want at their fingertips. It’s no wonder that WinnaVegas is one of the most popular casino resorts in the region.

WinnaVegas Casino

Challenge

In the gaming business, speed and efficiency are everything, including surveillance and security. After recent expansion of its casino, hotel and parking areas, WinnaVegas Casino Resort needed to update its surveillance system with a cost-effective way to migrate from analog to fast, high-performing IP video technology. With some video monitoring systems and IP cameras, there is latency, or delay, between the operator’s joystick command and the camera’s movement. WinnaVegas surveillance operators wanted to be able to quickly track a patron moving across the casino floor or zoom in for a closer look at a player’s hand of cards, so low latency cameras were required.

Solution

Illustra ProThe Illustra Pro PTZ and mini-dome cameras in combination with the victor/VideoEdge Video Monitoring System from Tyco Security Products give the casino resort the high-resolution video and low latency needed for its growing and complex operations. The Illustra PTZ cameras allow WinnaVegas surveillance staff to actively monitor happenings on gaming floors with exceptional situational awareness and reliable control to easily identify clear details.

The cameras’ bandwidth usages are low, using H.264 compression to reduce bandwidth to a fraction of that used by most 1080p HD PTZ cameras. Lower bandwidth provided by Illustra cameras reduces network traffic, saves on storage costs and keeps communications between devices and servers nimble and efficient.

Victor and VideoEdge provided the casino with a bridge between its existing analog system and new IP system. victor/VideoEdge ties in the casino’s Illustra IP cameras and VideoEdge network video recorders and hybrid recorders with its existing analog infrastructure, allowing operators to manage live and recorded video through a single interface. Real-time alarms and events also can be leveraged with video, audio, motion and other advanced features to provide the immediate birds-eye view needed by the casino resort.

VideoEdge network video recorders were added to provide the speed and power desired by WinnaVegas Casino Resort and its operations. VideoEdge enables multiple video streams for live, record, alarm bump and meta-data collection and features Smart Search for fast searches that staff can export event findings when needed. The NVRs’ multicast video streaming technology and victor’s built-in intelligence further reduce bandwidth requirements.

The Tyco Security Products solution delivered the simplified management, seamless integration into one, unified security system and high quality images.  As WinnaVegas contemplates its next expansion, it won’t need to roll the dice with an entirely new proprietary system or transition completely to IP technology—WinnaVegas can build upon its existing victor, VideoEdge, Illustra solution and grow its security system as needed, one chip at a time.

Read the full case study.

Learn more about migrating from analog to IP.

VMS on the edge: an all in one video solution

Given the choice between complexity and simplicity, most of us choose the easy path. If there is a way to take difficulty out of any day-to-day activity, we’re all for it.

Today’s technology is increasingly reflecting our need for a pared down, but still high-quality approach. Think about some of the appliances residing in your own home. Instead of a separate blender, food processor, ice crusher and mixer, many kitchens now have a single machine — a super blender, if you will — that handles all of these chores.

edgecamIn the security space, cameras with edge-based video recording capabilities are filling a similar niche. Especially for small businesses that don’t have the luxury of a large security staff, space to house multiple servers or the infrastructure to support multiple recording devices, opting instead for cameras with embedded VMS software and onboard video storage can prove to be a capable and affordable alternative.

Having a type of all-in-one solution makes high-tech security more accessible to users who only need a handful of IP cameras for their installation. However, these businesses — both large and small — still require a robust array of valuable features and they want them delivered in a user-friendly manner.

Just being able to record video clips to an SD card will cover the most basic security needs in an edge-based video system, but this is just a simple folder of video clips. Like the multi-featured super blender, end users are often looking for something more.

SD cardFortunately, advancements in SD cards and camera processor technology provide enough horsepower to deliver not only onboard storage but video management system capabilities. This means that beyond just recording and organizing clips, business owners or security personnel can take advantage of features such as synchronized search and retrieval of the recorded video across all or specific cameras in their system. These video management tasks can be performed on a desktop or on mobile devices such as tablets or smartphones with live view or playback.

And while edge-based VMS software provides myriad benefits to smaller locations with a handful of cameras, larger organizations are also leveraging this technology. This includes the large retailer wanting a few cameras at its stores that are independent from the onsite, locally monitored surveillance network.  Or, this approach can also benefit other large enterprise installations looking for freedom from managing a central server architecture for small branch locations or remote locations in the field, where a few cameras are needed but server installation is impractical.

Small or large, end users looking to employ this technology are also benefitting from new high reliability SD cards, some of which are designed specifically for the recording of HD video. Various cameras on the market, such as our new Illustra Edge series, can also provide redundancy protection for network outages, providing a backup of the recorded video that can be retrieved and storedback to a central server.

And with each camera having its own embedded VMS capability, businesses have the added assurance that even if one camera in the system fails, the others in their installation will continue to perform the critical video surveillance system duties.

This newest generation of edge-based video adds a higher level of value for end users who want storage and recording capabilities but without the investment of time, space and maintenance associated with traditional server set ups.

It is the perfect melding of simplicity with effective, cutting-edge technology — ice crusher not included.

To hear more about edge based video management as well as tips on how to calculate bandwidth and storage requirements and how to take advantage of other vendor supplied tools for easier installations, please register for the upcoming free webinar from SDM Magazine: “Making the Right Choices in IP Video,” at 2pm EDT on June 16, 2015, sponsored by Illustra from Tyco Security Products.

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A little planning goes a long way toward achieving analytics success

The odd impulse purchase aside, most people go into a buying decision with a good idea of what they want from their investment.

A couple that is expecting triplets, for instance, knows they can bypass the two-seater sports car or the pickup and look in the SUV or minivan category for a vehicle that will adequately and safely serve their family.

Similarly, a company that is putting in a new video analytics system should outline what it wants it to achieve before selecting, installing and operating it. Or at least that is what best practices would dictate.

Yet, too often the opposite happens. Eager customers and their systems integrators determine the number and styles of cameras camera, ip camera, securitythey want, maybe based on the newest technology or the best deals available, without first exploring exactly what they want to achieve in terms of analytics. So the end result is a system that is inadequate for the application and one that poorly reflects on the quality of the video analytics because it couldn’t perform the necessary functions properly.

Where and how cameras are placed is critical to achieving the most effective outcome with analytics. From camera mounts to the number and type of cameras, many factors can impact the success of video analytics.

Fortunately, you don’t have to go it alone when it comes to planning. Working in conjunction with your systems integrator, or a manufacturer’s representative, take a hard look at what your expectations are for your analytics system: Are you looking to count people coming into your store, or is your goal to read license plates in a parking lot? If you want to count customers, do you also want to measure how long they look at a display? Every activity requires careful consideration regarding the type of camera used and where it is placed.

People counting is best done on a two-dimensional scale, so a camera mounted overhead works well here. If the camera were placed at eye level, and a crowd came into the store, you might not be able to see each person because some people likely would be blocked by those in front of them.

If the goal is to determine who is lingering in a particular spot, however, then a wide-angle camera is the proper choice. And if you want to do both of these things in the same space, you’ll need multiple cameras mounted appropriately.

Lighting is another key consideration when deploying analytics. If a scene goes in and out of shadows frequently, it will affect the accuracy of the information received. Trying to read license plates? Think about how headlights could play havoc with a camera if positioned incorrectly.

Before going ahead with an analytics program, it’s important to consider all of the factors that will impact video quality. From illumination to separating assets and people to dealing with obstructions and movement, all of these can make a great analytics system an ineffective one if not handled properly.

So sit down at that computer — or if you’re old school, get out that pen and paper — and list what you want your system to do. Then go through all the factors that could influence your outcome before making a final selection with the help of an integrator or supplier on cameras and mounts.

The success of your analytics system depends on it. Watch our videos below on victor and VideoEdge video intelligence and analytics.

 

Putting video to work in new ways

Tyco Security Products

A video surveillance system can be a multi-tasker, especially when deployed within a factory or production environment. From shipping and logistics, where it provides control support and documentation, to operations, where it can assist with deploying personnel, video has the ability to go well beyond its usual security and safety functions.

Companies can harness their video surveillance system to show current or potential clients how different processes work within their organization. If quality control within a distribution facility is the focus, video systems can be tapped to show the progress of an order from the time it is placed, through the automated or manual picking process and ending with the completed order. Without having to be in the room or on site, a customer can receive assurance about the integrity of the order fulfillment process just by viewing it live through the video surveillance system.

A CCTV system can also benefit the logistics operations of a manufacturer. Cameras can help dispatch personnel by determining which loading bay is empty and ready to receive a shipment for off-loading, or indicate the dock to which a truck can be sent to be loaded with product for distribution.

A manufacturershipping product to the United States, for example, needs to document the contents of each container or truck to meet the country’s anti-terrorism import measures, also known as C-TPAT. Having evidence of the packing and shipping operations on video can aid in compliance with these regulations, which ensures easier passage through U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

Additionally, the camera system provides visibility regarding the movement of pallets or goods throughout different areas of the warehouse, providing an additional layer of quality control for warehousing operations.

Cameras focused on conveyor systems for security purposes can also make important information on product flow available, especially when analytics are used to count product or monitor productivity. Identifying areas where bottlenecks occur can translate into money and time savings for the company.

Surveillance cameras have even helped car dealers show off their inventory to customers when conditions aren’t ideal, such as during a snowstorm or when it is raining. The same system that can identify potential thieves is also capable of offering virtual tours to eager buyers.

By thinking about video in new ways, users can build on their investment in surveillance and achieve new levels of functionality, efficiency and cost savings.

Why not think about how video can do double duty within your operations?

Video test and verify: When spec sheets aren’t enough

As a nation we have become a bit obsessed with numbers. More specifically, we are fixated by those digits that translate to the concept of “bigger is better”.

We’ve seen it over the years with vehicles, as people transitioned from sub-compacts and compacts to SUVs. Why settle for a small car when a bigger one can give you more length, more width and more seats? Of course, people often forget about the downside of “bigger”, which means higher cost and lower gas mileage.

The same phenomena that has swept through the automobile industry has been seen in american dynamics, video security, tyco security productselectronics with people wanting higher resolution TVs, computers with more processing power and phones with better, faster connections.

In the security industry, the “bigger is better” mantra is often used in the camera arena with spec sheets touting cameras with 3, 5 and even 8 megapixels. Although the bulk of installed cameras are still in the 2 megapixel range, it’s hard not to be intrigued by the siren song of more megapixels. If 2 megapixels are good, wouldn’t 8 be better?

Although the car dealer wants dearly to sell you that more expensive, more expansive SUV, you’re not likely to make the decision without getting into the vehicle and giving it a test drive. You may find upon driving it that there are trade offs you’re not willing to make, like seeing the gas gauge move quickly into the E position.

Similarly, anyone looking to replace or add cameras to their surveillance system, or integrators looking to expand or update their product line, should test the cameras as well. Relying solely on the specifications provided on a product spec sheet is like buying the SUV by just reading the sticker on the door and never getting behind the wheel. A camera may have looked great on paper, but until you see how it works in real-life situations, it’s hard to be certain.

This is especially difficult because the industry as it stands now doesn’t have standards for specifications, so there could very well be variances among manufacturers. One company’s measurement of low-light performance or Wide Dynamic Range can be vastly different than another’s. Can you really trust the numbers?

Putting a camera through its paces will allow you to see if it is the right one for a specific situation and more importantly, if it lives up to its hype. Many high-resolution cameras offering more than 3 megapixels, are still equipped with lenses that aren’t rated above 3 megapixels. For example, when bubble covers are added over the lens what is the optical performance of the bubble material? Can it transmit the high resolution?

Just as the SUV can be viewed as a gas guzzler vs. its subcompact cousin, high-res cameras can betaxing on bandwidth and storage capacity. Sending more data through the pipeline means using more bandwidth. The tradeoff could be that your current set up can only accommodate a portion of the cameras you had used previously, and that you’ll also need to spend more on networking hardware and storage. Higher resolution cameras do have their place in the overall surveillance system, but the decision point should be determined by the camera’s location and the subject detailneeded in the scene.

As much as we all want the latest and greatest, the biggest and the best, the bottom line is that when it comes to investing in new technology, numbers don’t tell the whole story. With today’s high megapixel cameras, it behooves integrators and security personnel to put them through their paces, seeing how they deliver video in different lighting conditions, various weather scenarios, etc. See how a higher resolution camera performs against a 2 or 3 megapixel camera in the same location. Is the higher resolution camera truly delivering a more effective solution and overcoming the associated tradeoffs?

Ultimately, the proof will be found in the video, not on the spec sheet. If you want to ensure that you make an informed and good decision on a product, make sure real-life testing is an integral part of your decision-making process.

Click here to view a review of the Industry’s HD Static Dome Cameras
http://content.yudu.com/Library/A33r29/BenchmarkOctober2014/resources/8.htm

Security Hardening & Its Importance to Protecting Your Security System

Not a day goes by, it seems, that we are not hearing about some sort of security breach involving a major retail operation or corporation. Hackers seem determined on getting at protected data, such as credit card information or Social Security numbers, by any means possible.

For the security industry, every such attack brings new concerns about the safety of network-based systems. The network is the back door to accessing all kinds of information, whether it is financial, personal or something specific to the security of an operation.

Protecting Your Security SystemFor instance, a cyber criminal may be looking to interfere with a security system by interrupting the video stream, altering camera views so someone can make a physical attack on a location or hijacking the servers to perform illegal functions. Even a camera, if left vulnerable, may be used as an entry point to a larger network.

As a result, it is increasingly important to know what steps a security system provider is taking to ensure that its network-based equipment such as NVRs and video management system software are hardened against cyber attacks.

While the U.S. Federal Information Security Act mandates a specific level of compliance, it is critical to work with a supplier that understands what is involved in the compliance process, and is invested in taking a lead on this critical issue.

Here are some questions to ask a security system supplier:

  • How often are updates provided for the product and how are security vulnerabilities handled?  More frequent updates to the product means more opportunity to remove vulnerabilities. Also, by monitoring new vulnerabilities found through international databases a supplier can release a patch quickly to address a critical vulnerability.
  • Is the company undergoing third-party assessments of its products? Having an independent, third-party undertake penetration testing will point out what vulnerabilities exist and allow the company to take the proper action to harden the system against cyber attacks.
  • How often does the vulnerability testing take place? Each time the software within a product or system is altered, there should be a new test so the development team can address any new software issues before the product is released.
  • Has the company documented what it is doing? Knowing what the vulnerabilities are and how they have addressed them can go a long way toward ensuring your comfort level with a product. Ask if the company has prepared a white paper or some other document on its products and processes.

Cyber criminals continue to develop new methods for gaining access to information and systems. Knowing how a supplier is safeguarding its products is a good first line of defense.

 

What questions do you have about security hardening? Please leave it in the comments section below.

Keeping Eyes on Home with Video Surveillance System

Busy professionals are always trying to keep up with activities at home. As one of the U.K.’s premier broadcasters, Gabby Logan’s job has taken her to Poland, Ukraine, South Africa and back again.

The former gymnast turned sports presenter began her broadcast career in 1992 as a radio personality, and then quickly expanded into television with Sky Sports, ITV and BBC. Gabby has covered the London Olympics for BBC and England’s football team in the 2010 FIFA World Cup and Euro 2012. Gabby also served a short stint in Brazil covering England’s football team in the 2014 FIFA World Cup, making a quick return to the UK to present from the 2014 Commonwealth Games in Scotland beginning in late July.

To balance full time careers and life at home, Gabby and her husband Kenny, an ex Scotland International Rugby star, realized that they needed to implement some type of system that would allow her to keep an eye on things at home while she took care of business on road. Whether gone for the day, or away on a trip thousands of miles from England, a home security system that incorporated video surveillance was the solution Gabby needed to stay connected to her family when Kenny was back at home in charge of the family and property.

Working with Vindex Systems in West Sussex, a specialist integrator of CCTV, access control and automatic number plate recognition solutions that works with both public and private sector clients, the Logans selected a system from Tyco Security Products’ American Dynamics range that incorporated the VideoEdge Network Video Recorder (NVR) and Illustra 600 indoor/outdoor IP Mini-Dome cameras.

Using a monitor at home, Gabby and Kenny can actively watch the video from the cameras on the grounds, or view recorded video with the VideoEdge NVR. The system even allows the Logans to save snapshots of specific video images.

Video Surveillance SystemBut the real selling point of the system was the ability, through an iPhone application, to watch live and recorded video from her home surveillance system from anywhere she may be. Now, Gabby has the ability while on the road to check on her home, her family, and any situations that may occur through the VideoEdge Go app.

VideoEdge Go is a full-featured video surveillance viewer that delivers added value to the system and enhances the day-to-day experience by facilitating remote monitoring and forensic investigating from anywhere.

The free, downloadable app works with Logan’s iPhone or other Apple iOS device. And because the video is streamed via a wifi, 3G or 4G connection in H.264 rather than MJPEG, it takes up less space on whatever device she is using.

While England was competing in the World Cup in June, Gabby was onsite with the team, but also in touch with home through her surveillance system and the VideoEdge Go app.

Download the Gabby Logan case study for more details.

Stadium Security | balance visitor safety with visitor enjoyment

Protecting sporting events where large groups of people gather has been at the forefront of the security industry of late, especially with the recent completion of Super Bowl XLVIII at MetLife Stadium in New Jersey and the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia.

Thousands of miles and continents apart, both events attract thousands of spectators from around the world to cheer on their favorite teams or support their home country. Despite their differences, with the Super Bowl celebrating the big game of one of America’s favorite sports and the Winter Olympics celebrating multi-national competition, they both have many commonalities from a security standpoint.

Stadium SecurityStadium and event security are two of the most challenging security scenarios because they bothrequire calculated combinations of manpower and technology to continuously monitor large groups of people. And even with a series of security checkpoints along the way to scan tickets and to manually check bags and backpacks to guard against banned items, these events still require a continuously watchful eye to quickly identify problems and ensure crowds do not get out of control.

That’s where surveillance technology comes into play. In the last five years, upgrading surveillance in stadiums has been one of the most sought after projects because it provides the ability to remotely monitor an event from a single command center and to proactively respond to an issue before it unfolds.

As part of Panama’s preparations to host the 39th Baseball World Cup in 2011, country officialsoutfitted four baseball stadiums in four different cities with new IP-based surveillance technology, which enabled security personnel to quickly identify problems and maintain control of potential security incidents. With the American Dynamics VideoEdge Network Video Recorder (NVR) and the victor Unified Client as the video management solution, these stadiums were able to monitor live surveillance footage for faster response as well be able to quickly search through recorded video after an incident occurred.

Fenway Park, home to the 2013 World Series Champion Boston Red Sox and Major League Baseball’s oldest stadium, provides yet another example where major upgrades to the surveillance systems at this stadium served as the foundation for a recent, large-scale security improvement project. With 35,000 fans coming in and out of the stadium on game day, it was time for the stadium to install an IP-based surveillance system to improve security’s view throughout the entire facility and to protect spectators. Integrating American Dynamics video solutions with Kantech access control, Fenway Park was able to update their security system and poise themselves for future innovation. Watch this great video covering Fenway’s latest security upgrade.

Sporting events are not the only large-scale surveillance challenges; take for instance the Hollywood Bowl in California, with an audience over 18,000 and so much talent on display, it represents a daunting security challenge. Every corner of the stage, parking lots, and neighboring freeways are carefully monitored to ensure that people and traffic are moving freely. The stage manager relies heavily upon the live video to ensure the show starts on time, allows him to call for more ushers to move people along, or delay the opening act if necessary.

Next time you attend an event, whether it’s a baseball game, football game, or a music concert, you can most certainly expect that surveillance is playing an important role to keep both the facility and spectators safe.

 

What concerns you the most with large-scale security installations? Please leave your concern in the comment section below.

Network Video Tipping Point is Just Around the Corner

Much touted and highly anticipated, 2014 finally will be the year when network video can claim its dominance over analog, according to a recent report from IMS Research.  This “tipping point” –  whennetwork video revenues overtake those of analog systems — will occur  because, while analog cameras will still outsell network models on a per unit basis through 2017,  higher-priced IP video systems will become the revenue leader.

Already, the report tells us, the network surveillance equipment market grew by more than 10 percent from 2011 to 2012 and was anticipated to grow by more than 20 percent this year. In the world market, only China has increased analog sales; elsewhere growth is driven mainly by IP-based equipment.Video Security Network - Tyco Security Products - American Dynamics

Certainly those of us in the marketplace continue to see a growing acceptance of IP-based video security solutions because of the inherent flexibility, improved networking capabilities and enhanced functionality offered.

End users who invested in analog cameras are still able to begin the migration to IP because of the advent of hybrid NVRs that bring together existing analog units with new high-definition IP cameras on a single platform.  This means that network surveillance systems are no longer the exclusive domain of major enterprises; small and mid-size companies have started to invest in and build IP based  surveillance systems so they can make the shift to IP at their own pace.

Meanwhile, networks have gotten faster over the past 10 years — nearly 100 times in many instances — and solutions have been improved so everything from installation to streaming video to recording is no longer a strain on network infrastructure and a burden on the IT department. With IT buy in, security personnel can make their case for more network-based components.

Add to that the fact that competition from analog cameras continues to drive down the cost of network-based solutions. The truth is, we’ve finally gotten comfortable with IP technology in the security space because we’ve seen it work in our day-to-day lives. We have adopted some of the same technologies, such as megapixel cameras in our smart phones, so it only makes sense that these features should become more common and lower cost as they proliferate.

But one of the biggest factors for network solutions reaching the tipping point has to be the wide range of features these systems provide. IP-based systems with analytics that can interpret activities and behaviors and unified operations for database mining from video, access control, intrusion, fire and other systems offer a world of opportunity for today’s security director.

So here’s an early toast to 2014: The year of network video.

For more perspective on the tipping point from analog to video, read this recent coverage on the subject from Securityinfowatch. com.

Security Analytics Thwart Retail Theft, But Tell Us So Much More

For one department store, it seemed like business as usual as shoppers perused the racks of merchandise, picking out the latest fashions. But in the security office, the person on duty was alerted to an anomaly — on a merchandising display, an entire section of high-priced jeans had been removed quickly. Was this an overzealous shopper looking to try on multiple pairs, or someone from an organized retail theft ring sweeping up inventory?

In this specific scenario, an officer was made aware of this potential incident through the deployment of video analytics as part of the company’s overall surveillance plan and was able to respond quickly. The retailer had established a set of rules within the system’s software so an alert would be issued if more than half the inventory on that rack was removed in less than one minute —  a common scenario known as “shelf sweep” when shoplifters are at work.

The same analytics that are deployed for high-risk security settings, such as airports and government buildings, are equally at home in a retail setting. Security Analytics Retail: Tyco Security ProductsLike the shelf-sweep rule, similar guidelines can be created so a security officer can be alerted when someone enters a storeroom after hours or when an object, like a package, is left in one place for too long.

But what is equally exciting is that, because of the nature of analytics and its information-gathering abilities, its applications can go well beyond the security realm and become a boon to other store personnel.

Retailers who have included analytics in their security systems to both detect incidents as they happen and aid in forensic investigations of thefts, slip and falls and other activities, are expanding the reach of this investment and applying it to merchandising, marketing and operations.

After all, these cameras are operating 24/7 so why not take this database of information and look at it in the aggregate?

Let’s go back to that department store and see how analytics can help sell some handbags. Data supplied by the point-of-sale system will tell the store operator how many designer purses have sold, but not how many potential sales of those handbags there were on a given day.

By using the video system, the store can track how many people came through the doors (the total pool of potential buyers), and then break it down even further, using rules within the analytics to narrow down how many people walked down the aisle where the handbags were merchandised and then how many of those shoppers lingered for more than five minutes at the display. This information, teamed with the POS data, can now give that store’s manager a conversion rate on the sale of her designer handbags.

Armed with the knowledge of how many bags were sold vs. how many people stopped to look at them, it may mean that the purses are in a great spot or, if the conversion rate is poor, this is an indicator that the bags need to be displayed elsewhere or the signage improved or the price reduced. Analytics won’t read the minds of the shoppers, but the data can provide a good snapshot of what occurred within the store. Using analytics to determine traffic numbers and patterns can aid in where to locate merchandise and even help set the number of checkouts needed on a given day.

From a security standpoint, analytics in video surveillance is a necessary part of doing business, but by expanding the potential of its use, the entire retail operation can benefit — deploying the same equipment, but just tweaking the data to fit each users’ needs.  It can be win-win for both security and operations, and who doesn’t like that?

For more on the role of video analytics as part of a retail security solution, download our recent white paper on Video Analytics in Retail.


Download The Video Analytics White Paper